agroecology
agroecology

Hot off the press: New Book on Political, Transformation and Territorial dimension to bring forward an Agroecological Urbanism

Building on state-of-the-art and participatory research on farming, urbanism, food policy and advocacy, this new book changes the ways food planning has been conceptualised to date, and invites the reader to fully embrace the transformative potential of an agroecological perspective. It argues for moving away from a “food in the city” approach, …

Reflecting on ORFC 2021: Blinking into the Light – Galvanising Food Movements in Troubling Times

Few of us would say that we’re not happy to see the back of 2020. For one thing, it’s fundamentally changed how we live and work, often for the worse. We’ve all missed the creativity that emerges from human connection, and many of us are now bound to long hours …

Hot off the press: New Open Access Book on Transformations Towards More Just and Sustainable Food Systems

This new open access book develops a framework for advancing agroecology in transformations towards more just and sustainable food systems focusing on power, politics and governance. It explores the potential of agroecology as a sustainable and socially just alternative to today’s dominant food regime.  Agroecology Now! Transformations Towards More Just and …

Agroecology or Collapse Part III – Reclaiming the ‘archaic’, ‘anarchic’, and ‘utopian’ as the language of food system transformation

Agroecology is a struggle to overcome industrial agriculture and is simultaneously a practice, a science, and a movement. Detractors often criticize Agroecology saying it is archaic, anarchic, & utopian. Perhaps, paradoxically, this is where its potential lies.  Agroecology is archaic, anarchic, and utopian – of course it is and thank …

Seeking New Agreements for Working with Nature through Enhancing Agricultural Biodiversity

In this first article in our new column, Agroecology in Motion: Nourishing Transformation, Patrick Mulvany, (HRF, CAWR), makes a call to radically foreground a more robust and transformative understanding of agricultural biodiversity, especially the need to enhance the agricultural biodiversity embedded within all seeds, breeds and agroecosystems, making these more …

Announcing “Agroecology in Motion: Nourishing Transformation”

Articles written for Agroecology in Motion: Nourishing Transformation are written to stimulate reflection and learning, inform political-practical work on agroecology and move people to action. This first article in the column lays the groundwork for future contributions. To follow the column and other AgroecologyNow updates, Follow us on Facebook, Twitter …

Shifting European Finance towards Food Systems Tranformation: A Webinar

Biovision Foundation, CIDSE, IPES-Food, AgroecologyNow! at the Center for Agroecology Water and Resilience (CAWR) of Coventry University, the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), Coalition Contre la Faim, DanChurchAid, are presenting a webinar on  “Shifting European Finance towards Food System Transformation”. The event will take place on the 26th of November, from 2 …

Agroecology or Collapse Part II – Democratizing Food Systems and Breaking the Bonds of Food Empires

Thinking that the agroecology movement is limited to producing organics in a “differentiated niche” is a mistake. Its focus is to redirect agriculture according to logics that oppose and subvert the capitalist market. In Part II of this three-part series, Paulo Petersen and Denis Monteiro dig deeper into articulating capitalist …

Agroecology or Collapse: Part 1 – From Emergency Responses to Systemic Transformations

In this first of a three-part contribution to Agroecologynow, Paulo Petersen and Denis Monteiro present the current moment as a crisis in capitalism that demands systemic and structural responses based in solidarity and feminist economics. This lays the foundations for agroecology as a new organizing paradigm for food systems that …

The battle for the future of farming: what you need to know

Most concede that there is an urgent need to radically transform our food systems. But the proposed innovations for more sustainable food systems are drastically different. Which we choose will have long-lasting effects on human society and the planet. This article, written by Michel Pimbert and Colin Anderson was published …